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Former USciences Cross Country Standout Chrissy Woodruff DPT'04 Becomes Second-Ever Devil Inducted into CACC Hall of Fame

Former USciences Cross Country Standout Chrissy Woodruff DPT'04 Becomes Second-Ever Devil Inducted into CACC Hall of Fame

CACC Release

NEW HAVEN, Conn. – Former University of the Sciences cross country standout Chrissy Woodruff DPT'04 became the second Devil in USciences Athletics history to be inducted into the Central Atlantic Collegiate Conference (CACC) Hall of Fame, as the 2019 Class was announced on Wednesday.

Her induction will be celebrated in a ceremony at Belmont Plateau on Sunday, Oct. 27, the day of the 2019 CACC Cross Country Championship. 

Woodruff joins former Head Men's Basketball Coach and Athletic Director Robert "Bobby" Morgan, who was inducted in the first-ever class in 2015.

Woodruff was one of four individuals inducted in 2019, bringing the total number of individuals in the CACC Hall of Fame to 19. University of the Sciences becomes the sixth school in the 14-team conference with multiple individuals inducted.

"The Class of 2019 is an impressive group of individuals who earned not only numerous conference honors, but regional and national accolades," CACC Commissioner Dan Mara said. "The Central Atlantic Collegiate Conference has a history filled with historic moments and these former student-athletes contributed to many of those. They helped to grow the CACC at both the NAIA and NCAA Division II levels. The current success the conference enjoys can be traced to their important efforts."

Woodruff won the CACC individual championship – thus claiming the league's Runner of the Year honors - three straight years from 2000-02, becoming the first harrier to accomplish that feat. She remains one of just two women's runners in CACC history to complete the task.

She won the 2001 race by 34 seconds, completing the 5k course in 19:30.01, to break her own CACC Championship record set in 2000 by 20 seconds. That 2001 mark stood as the fastest time in women's cross country championship history for six years. She then led wire-to-wire at the 2002 race, winning the event by one minute and 21 seconds.

In addition to her success at the conference level, Woodruff finished in the top-three of two NAIA regional meets, taking second in 2001 and third in 2002, and competed in three consecutive NAIA National Championship races from 2000 to 2002.